The Tower

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The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:19 am

What is The Tower? The tower in short, is my home. Its also a long term experiment, work of art, money pit, what have you.




The tower is located on ten acres of land in a secret location deep in the rocky mountains. It was conceived and started before I really knew what 'Steampunk' was. All I had to go with at the time was a vague, 'Sort of like medieval/post-apocalyptic kinda of Firefly' theme. It wasn't until after I had moved into the first floor that I started to actually think of it as steampunk, although many aspects of already fit that term.

The core design was created by myself while living in a 12x12 cabin near Fairbanks Alaska. This lifestyle led to me to come to several conclusions which become instrumental in the eventual design. I wanted to have my own house. I didn't want to go into debt. I didn't want a house larger than I could easily manage by myself. I wanted the house to be energy efficient and as off the grid as possible.

Fairly early in the process I started leaning towards straw bale construction as it full filled many of my requirements. Because you can build curved walls using strawbale without the same material penalties as stick houses I quickly decided that this building would be round. When I learned that the roof and foundation are the most expensive components of a house I decided that a tower would best serve my interests. Minimal roof and foundation, maximum wall area (the cheapest component of strawbale construction)

It took me about two years to save up about $5K and move back from Alaska. I broke ground in spring of 2006. I hired a local man with a Bobcat and for $200 he carved a couple terraces out of the hillside that was to be my building site.














Last edited by Mr. Tower on Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:15 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:13 am

So, now that I had a place to build the real work began.

When I did the calculation for the amount of concrete I would need to pour my foundation I came to the depressing realization that the cost to hire a concrete cement truck and pour the needed yardage would consume most of my funds.

On the other hand, if I was able to replace 50% of the volume needed with rock and mix and pour the concrete myself I could pour the foundation for less than $1K.

The first stage was to dig the ring wall footing. Due to the compact and stony nature of my soil digging below the frost line was not a consideration. What was a consideration was the weight of straw bale walls, which are much heavier than standard stick construction. After a few calculations I determined that my wall footings should be 24" thick and 20" wide. (You want your footings to be slightly narrower than the thickness of your walls.

Because I planned to make up much of the volume with stone I decided that instead of building forms that I would build two stone and mortar walls, 24" high and then fill the space in between with rebar, loose stone and cement. The walls would be 4-6" thick which would cut down substantially on the concrete that I would need. This was a mistake (more on that later)

First stage was to dig a trench for the footings, 18" deep. The trench needed to be perfectly round and more or less level. After much deliberation I choose a spot to be tower dead center and drove in a large steel spike. I used this and a rope to lay out to concentric stake lines and began digging.

Due to the extremely hard and rocky nature of my 'soil' and other considerations this took me a lot longer than you would think that it would. Half the summer was gone before I was done. When I was finished with the trench it was time to face my next challenge. Leveling.

Although the bottom of trench was somewhat level I knew that the top of the ringwall and thus the foundation needed to be completely level. Normally, this would be accomplished with a carpenters transit or a laser level. I had neither and with money extremely tight I felt that I could not afford such tools.

The solution I cam up with is rather clever even if I do say so myself. I first pounded a vertical rebar stake into the center of the foundation trench, leaving a foot or so sticking up past where the foundation would end to secure the straw bales. I next filled the trench with water until it was several inches deep. Since standing water will always be level and at the same level I had a point of reference. I took a can of spray paint and sprayed each rebar stack at the point where it met the water, this left me with a perfect point of reference on every rebar stake that I could use to measure an even height all the way around my wall, regardless of the level of the ground.

Next step was to acquire the rock I would need. Earlier in the summer I had found a rock slide next to a road in a remote valley near to where I lived. As far as I am concerned this is free building materials. The agency that owns the public land may or may not agree with this view. I did not ask them. Over several weeks, working mostly at night I hauled approximately six tons of brick sized rock in the back of my 1/2 ton pickup truck. These where driven to my building site and then transported the last thirty or so feet with a wheelbarrow or just plain thrown depending on my mood. As I said before, this was a mistake

Construction on the twin foundation form walls began. It took a long time. All in all, It was four months between ground breaking and completion of the foundation walls.



In a crazy flurry of activity The Lady Branwyn and I mixed and poured approximately 100 80lb sacks of concrete in a electric cement mixture over the course of two nights. At last, the foundation footings where done.

Unfortunately, so was all my money. Over the four months that I spent working on the wall I managed to spend nearly all the saved money I had on building and living expenses. With fall approaching it seemed as though my project was over for the time being. Yes, this was the first mistake I make, choosing a cheaper but back breakingly time consuming route that took so long that in the end It cost me more money than I saved.

In retrospect, it would have been wiser to build standard forms out of plywood and to hire the services of a cement truck. It would have saved me about two months of effort and probably cost the same in the end.

In order for this project to move forward I would have to do the last thing I wanted.....go into debt.





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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:58 am

With much trepidation, I borrowed money. In this case, it was from my parents, another $5k.

Thankfully, the next stage of the operation proceed much more quickly than expected. Once I got away from digging and rock hauling I found I could make progress rather quickly.

Earlier in the year I had borrowed a trailer and bought the bulk of the lumber needed for the tower, approximately $2.5k, purchased mostly from Lowes.

Now came the time to build and in less than two weeks I had the framework, floors and roof constructed. Since this was a hybrid post and beam construct the framework is much much lighter than would be the case for a normal building since the beams would carry only vertical loads with all the shear strength coming from the walls themselves. This requires a lot of ladder work on a shaky structure. Luckily for me, I am not afraid of heights, only of falling from heights which I prevented by extensive use of safety ropes.




All throughout the project something had been bugging me. I had not yet found a source for straw bales. This may or may not seem strange but in my part of the country wheat production is relatively rare do to climate and soil conditions. I had been keeping my eyes open all summer but going into lat september I hadn't found anything.

Its important to note here that its very important to use straw, not hay in this kind of construction. Straw is the dried hollow stems that are left over from wheat, barely rice or rye production. It has no nutritional value and is chemically identical to wood. It is generally considered a waste product.

Hay is the dried leafy part of grass that is used for animal feed, it is full of nutrients and is rots very quickly when wet. It is relatively expensive compared to straw.

Luckily, I happened to see straw bales for sale at a local feed store. They were asking $5 a piece for them and only had about twenty in stock. Thankfully, when I told the manager that I was looking to buy 200 bales she gave me the number of her supplier who lived about fifty miles away. I soon arranged to meet with him and found that he had several thousand high quality wheat straw bales that had been kept under a roof from the previous year and he was willing to sell them at $2.50 a piece if I hauled them myself. I soon borrowed a trailer and in only three trips had all my bales safely stacked in a Costco portable carport that a friend had given me.

I finished the roof, (composed of asphalt shingles) just before christmas of the first year. I building at this point was somewhat slowed do to my enrollment in an EMT program but by the end of the year I had past my final test and my time was again my own. With help The Lady Branwyn I began stacking bales.

The first stage of wall building was to lay down a layer of high density foam board over the foundation to prevent condensation between the cold concrete and the bales. Next the bales where impaled on the rebar spikes that had been left protruding from the foundation for that purpose.

Stacking bales is fun! Its exactly like playing with giant fuzzy legos. In one day the two of us built a wall completely around the first floor. Any time you need a bale cut to size you simple retie it with baling twin at the length you want it and cut the original ties. Where we need to cut out slot to fit around the support beams we used an electric chainsaw to carve out the spaces. Yes...we used a chainsaw on straw bales. Its as fun as it sounds.

And that was where the fun ended. The second stage of wall building is two sew reenforcing wire mesh on both sides of the wall. In this case I used 2x4" 14 gauge welded wire fencing. It was stretched over the walls, inside and out and then sewn from both sides with giant needles. This operation works best with two people, one on each side to grab the twine and push it back through the wall, pulling it as tight as possible. It is time consuming and boring. We passed much of the time by listing to various fantasy and sci-fi audio books.


The black stuff in the picture is tarpaper covering the inner side of the wooden support beams. You do not want to place stucco directly on wood since the wood will eventually shrink or warp and crack the stucco. The tar paper allows the beam to slid and flex behind the stucco.



But sewing the bales is not nearly as boring as stuffing straw. Since bales are somewhat irregular in shape after you cover them in wire you find that there are many voids between the wire and bales that need to bee stuffed with handfuls of loose straw until the wall is solid. This takes forever. Again, audiobooks are your friends.




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Re: The Tower

Post  Herkimer on Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:45 am

That is one very original structure. I would never have thought of straw, but now that you've mentioned it, I'll bet the insulating properties are VERY good.

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Re: The Tower

Post  W. S. Marble on Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:00 am

Outstanding project! I cannot wait to see the finished project. I have a solitary, remote acre on a mountain in Virginia, that I would love to do something similar with. Hay bales covered with a plaster finish could be the best answer to so many challenges, from cost to ease of construction. Well done (so far), sir!

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Re: The Tower

Post  The Lady Branwyn on Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:34 pm

W. S. Marble wrote:I cannot wait to see the finished project.

I definitely agree, especially since I live in the structure. Wink

It's been really fun reading through this account, remembering all the steps we went through and seeing all the pictures I haven't looked at in years. Those two days of concrete pouring were intense. What Mr. Tower glossed over is the fact that our land is so steep that we couldn't drive those 100 80 lb sacks of concrete where we need them, and our attempts to move them in the wheelbarrow resulted in a lot of dumped sacks. We ended up slinging them over our shoulders and carrying them down the steep hill quite a bit. Toward the end we finally figured out that we could lay out a couple layers of plastic on the hillside and slide the sacks down them like a playground slide.

Oh, memory lane...

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Re: The Tower

Post  W. S. Marble on Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:43 pm

I have the exact same steepness problem....guess that is what "secluded" really means in those ads! What a great home/refuge that will be when you all finish. Congratulations!

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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:27 am

On 'Steepness', part of the reason I chose a tower design is that on a steep hill it is much easier to build up than it is to build out. If my house was a single story square it would require an enormous amount of dirt to be moved.

Where was I...oh yes...stuffing straw...

The straw stuffing stage went on for the next 87 years and was completed in march of 2093...

Or at least thats how it felt. Because at the time I had no good way of hauling bales to the second floor construction focused on the finishing the first floor walls and floor. It was now late winter in montana and the cold and my new job as approximately 25% of the local fire and ambulance service delayed things once again. One days when it was too cold to work on the tower I worked in my shop on the woodstove that I was building from an old pressure tank.

But the real struggle was the window frames. For some strange reason I decided that instead of framing the windows for the full thickness of the wall that I would make a simple 2x4 frame that would be mounted flush on the outside of the wall and that the wedge shaped window well, (designed after medieval arrow loop windows) would be formed from wire and stuffed straw. This turned out to be a nightmare of time consumption and the end result was window wells that where rather irregular in shape, or at least more irregular than what I wanted. In retrospect I should have just spent a little extra money and framed them with wood for the full thickness of the wall. In addition, instead of them 'floating' in the straw wall I should have anchored them on one side to the support beams.

But that wasn't what happened. What happened is that I spent several months halfheartedly stuffing straw and procrastinating. When I wasn't at the tower I scoured the local roadsides and hills for large flat rocks that I could used for the floor stones.

Eventually spring came and I the walls on the first floor where ready for stucco. I was almost out of money again, and I really really wanted to move out of my parents house where I had been living ever since returning from Alaska.

I decided that my best course of action was to focus all possible effort on making the first floor livable and finishing the rest of the tower as time and money allowed. With a few dollars now rolling in from my EMT and fire job I was started buying stucco mix.

There are many ways to make stucco and strawbale houses have been plastered with everything from spray on concrete to chicken manure but I chose to go with commercially available concrete based stucco. This was basically mortar mix with a few additives to increase working time and flexibility. It is mixed with sand and for the first coat, finely chopped straw for added strength. The straw fiber was created by filling a garbage can half full of loose straw and blending it with a weed eater until it was chopped into thin, short fibers.

Plaster began, on the inside since I wanted to move inside as quickly as possible. In total, three coats of stucco are recommended with a month or two waiting time between to allow the stucco to fully cure. With time and money running out I decided that one coat would be good enough to start with and that I could always come back and finish the room later once the rest of the tower was completed.

Stuccoing went relatively quickly, as did the pouring of the concrete and stone floor. Window frames where covered in clear plastic for the time being and a thick layer of straw was spread out on the second floor to provide insulation for the first floor room.

All that was needed was to provide heat, water and electricity to the room...

This photo, taken much later in our story, shows an exterior wall section with the first coat of stucco and the adjacent section being prepared to receive its first coat.




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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Tue Jan 08, 2013 2:50 am

Utilities.....

If you are a general contractor or someone who is inordinately fond of building codes you may wish to skip the following chapter. This also the point where you will begin to see how this lifestyle is not always a glamourous one.

I suppose now is a good time to talk about building codes. The short answer is, No, I didn't get an permits, I do not build to code except by accident. I have the good fortune to live in one of the few parts of the country with no building codes.

This doesn't mean that you can't build such a building to code, most places now have codes for straw bale construction,(Even California!) but this was simply not a problem I had to deal with.

So going back to the very beginning, providing power to the work site was my first priority. I accomplished this by putting a plug on a 250' roll of 12 gauge Romex electrical wire, plugging one end into a powered work shed near my parents house and rolling it down to my building site.

'Wiring' the first floor of the tower was fairly easy. Because I knew that this room was far from finished there was no point in putting in permanent wiring so I assembled a basic wiring system out of extension cords, inline switches and power strips, most of which where screwed to the ceiling. Providing power to the building was as simple as plugging in an extension cord.

Water. My parents had a well on the property, about 300' away but it only provided about 5 gallons per minute and digging in a hardline from the well to my house deep enough to be frost safe would have cost thousands of dollars. My solution was simple, I set a 55 gallon food safe plastic water barrel on the second floor and plumbed it in to my sink with flexible tubing (again, this was all supposed to be temporary) The barrel could was filled once or twice a week with a very long garden hose from the well standpipe.

What about a toilet you say? I didn't have one. I still don't. I grew up without one, although sometime in my late teens by parents had one installed. This is not say we didn't have running water or a bathroom, we certainly did, but the bathroom was actual a literal bathroom, no sink, no shower, just a huge spa sized bathtub. When I moved to alaska I found that fully sixty percent of the people living in and around fairbanks did not have running water and that rent prices where roughly doubled for the places that did.

So when I set out to build the tower I had a simple choice, spend roughly $10K to have a toilet but no house, or spend that same amount to have a house with no toilet. For me it was a simple decision and not a hardship and In general I find it amazing how much clean water is wasted to wash away poop, when all you really need is simple, reliable gravity.

But enough about that. Heat. I had managed to build a fairly nice (but untested) wood stove over the winter. Now it came to time to install it. I decided that I would use a metal chimeny and run it straight up through all the floors of the tower so that I could reclaim the vast amounts of heat that are wasted up normal chimney pipes.

And this is where I made an interesting discovery. Single wall, plain black stove pipe is incredibly expensive. For a chimney such as mine I was looking at $300 for a thin tube of steel a mere 30' long. This was outrageous. I worked for two years at a scrapyard, I knew the value of steel. I went to the local scrapyard and asked if they had any used well casing. For those of you don't know, well casing is a thick large diameter pipe that is pounded down into the ground during well drilling to support the walls of the well. Its generally about 6" in diameter and very thick, around 3/8'' of an inch, about twelve times thicker than stovepipe. The price? $2 a foot! Immediately bought thirty feet of it and in spent the next two days cutting, bending and welding it to produce the needed elbows and unions to construct my stovepipe.

Why this is not standard practice I have no idea. Well casing is vertically indestructible, proof against the hottest chimney fire and not prone to rusting out like the standard thin walled chimney pipe.

I won't lie, wrestling hundred pound sections of pipe into place was not fun but it was worth the savings and durability.

Finally, almost exactly a year after I began work, the tower was livable. True, I had one room, composed of roughly 200 square feet but that was much larger than the 144' cabin I had come from and it had the luxury of a 55 gallon water tank, something I never had in alaska.

With money almost gone and no prospect of any more for some time I spent my last $400 on an xbox 360 (I figured if I was going to be broke all summer anyway I may as well be able to play games) Smile And moved into my new 'house'

In this pic, taken I believe on the first day of living in The Tower you can see the corner of my stove, my ad hoc electrical system, TV, old xbox, bed, a few of my possessions and a couple of my medieval weapons. Everything that you need for survival.



Don't worry, things eventually got much much nicer.



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Re: The Tower

Post  Herkimer on Wed Jan 09, 2013 6:45 pm

I look forward to the next installment.
I do understand why building codes were adopted, but I tend to balk against what they have become here locally. Which is to say it is corrupt, and a petty fiefdom for certain people.
For example I can go buy a hot water heater, and install it myself, but then the local inspector will demand that I pay them to come inside my home and approve my installation. They have been known to show up with the police, and demand access without a warrant.
In fact when you buy one around here, the stores are required to make you fill out a form so that the inspector knows whose door to come knocking on. (I just go buy one a couple counties away where they don't ask) I've also seen more than once instance, where an inspector failed a high quality piece of equipment, that was well installed, only to force the builder to replace the equipment with something inferior. I remember my grandpa being forced to rip out an entire street worth of water and sewer pipe, twice, because he refused to pay the bribe the inspector was demanding. I had one inspector insist that a customer of mine remove all the wiring in a portion of a building because it was BIGGER than it needed to be... Suspect I've also seen an inspector insist that a customer needed a sensor and an electric actuator tied into the fire alarm system to unlock a door with a panic bar on it so that nobody could get trapped inside. That is the purpose of a panic bar in the first place. I argued the point, and the inspector held out his book thumping on a section that demanded exactly sort of equipment, for a completely different application and under a very specific set of circumstances that were not present. I finally proved my point by turning to the appropriate section and doing a bit of thumping myself. The inspector finally agreed, but he was sure to let me know he didn't appreciate, and wouldn't forget my interference. I couldn't care less, as I was running the only service call in that county that I've run in 10 years, and I wasn't even working on that equipment. I just happened to overhear and knew something about the subject.
I do want to clarify, most inspectors are good people, but it seems that many people let the least bit of power go to their head.

Mr Tower, I applaud your new abode. I figure that a man ought to have the right to build whatever he wants to build and live in, on his own property.

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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:57 am

I figure that a man ought to have the right to build whatever he wants to build and live in, on his own property.

I agree completely. I think building codes mostly exist to provide jobs to inspectors and licensers and to make it easier for banks and insurance to asses the value. Instead of codes I try to think more in terms of 'best practices'

And even though there is nothing that requires inspection agencies to be corrupt it seems that they all are. Its taken for granted that if you actually want to get anything done you have to bribe them.

A friend of mine who lives just a few miles away but just over the county line had to pay 10k$ in license fees before he could even begin building an addition to his house, things like this really make me sick considering that is how much I put into my house before I moved in. It seems like housing in this country is a giant system just designed to make people go into debt.

That and produce an endless stream of boring white boxes.

But I digress.

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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Wed Jan 16, 2013 1:55 am

So, back to the story.

At last, I was actually living in the tower. Kitchen, Bedroom and Living Room where all stuck in one 200 square foot round room but it was a start.

Not very much progress was made that first summer. About a week after I moved in the clutch on my truck blew up and left me without a car for the three weeks it took me to scrape up enough money for parts and then to learn how to fix a clutch and then preform the operation. A month or so after that I broke my foot slipping on wet board and then my parents needed me to house sit for them for three weeks while they helped my sister move up to Alaska.

I spent a lot of time working around the tower, picking up sticks and clearing brush and general homesteading operations. I started a small garden, which is a difficult endeavor here given the dense trees and very poor soil.

It wasn't a bad summer but not much happened and I was a bit apprehensive about the coming montana winter with no real roof insulation and windows that were cover only in plastic sheeting.

Luckily my sisters fiancée worked at a local lumber mill and since he was leaving for alaska that left an opening. I had no experience with lumber but I had several years of general heavy machinery experience and had no problem getting a job as the planer operator at the mill. Inexplicably I was put in charge of men far older and with much more experience than myself, a position that I would eventually come to hate but the job paid relatively well for this area and I got a 10% discount on wood products.

With my first paycheck I was able to afford enough wood to build a bridge from the upper terrace to the second floor. It had been my plan from the beginning for the main entrance to be on that floor but I hadn't been able to afford to build the bridge up until now.

Main beams for the bridge where already in place, constructed from logs that I had harvested and peeled early in the year and so planking over it was an easy task. Until the construction of the bridge my only access to the second and third floor was a 10'' wide plank named Max (science joke)

With the bridge in place I suddenly had easy access to the second floor and with a job I now had money, but as a side effect of having money, I had very little for free time for construction, working nine hours a day with an hour drive on each end. I began to pay back the 5K I owed my parents and started stockpiling materials. I did what I could on the weekends and over the course of the winter I finished stack bales and sewing wire on the second floor. I also began framing the walls on the third floor which would be made from conventional wood construction and covered with rough cut shiplap planks.

By spring I was ready to start stuccoing the second floor and finishing the third. I was literally making money faster than I could spend it but I had become incredibly frustrated with the slow pace of construction. Luckily (for me) for me the housing market was just beginning its crash and there was less and less work to do at my job. By mid summer I was able to convince my boss that I only needed to come to work two days a week and I was able to jump back into tower construction.

For some reason that escapes me at the moment I ended up complete finishing the third floor before the second floor was closed in and to make some much needed room in the tower I moved my bedroom up to its permanent location in the third floor, while leaving the living room and kitchen on the first. As of yet there was no way to actually move from the first floor to the third without walking outside and so for about a month I had the strange experience of a house composed of two rooms only accessible by going outside, climbing a hill, crossing a bridge, entering a door and climbing a ladder.





Late in the first winter



The bridge.


A an old picture of the inside of my rather messy bedroom taken around the same time as the other pictures. All the wood is blue pine that I picked out while working at the mill






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The Terrible color.

Post  Mr. Tower on Wed Jan 16, 2013 2:54 am

So for once I had a job, money, warm weather, and time.

By the end of that second summer I had completely finished the third floor, complete with glass windows!

Interior stuccoing was finished on the second floor and unlike the first floor I actually took the time to apply all three coats of stucco and had a fairly smooth finish. But for some reason I couldn't just leave it at that. Even though there are many ways to add pigment to stucco I had always wanted to paint the interior stucco surfaces go give them a smooth and easy to clean finish and to contain the fine dust that stucco seems to constantly shed.

Painting may seem like a simple task but for me it would cause the most consternation of any part of the operation so far. The thing is that pain and I do not really know each other. The house that I grew up in was entirely wood and so I never really learned how to paint a room or pick colors. It just wasn't a material or a technique that I was very familiar with. The one thing I knew is that it would not be some boring white or beige or an of the colors that its seems 90% of houses are painted.

Another problem that I had is that stucco is not a very common building material in my part of the world so there where few examples for me to look at.

I was also somewhat in a hurry since winter was again approaching and I wanted to put down the flooring in the second floor and move in, something I thought would be easier if I painted first.

For some reason I decided that what I wanted was a nice warm orangish earth tone effect. I picked out two colors that I thought looked good together with the idea of applying one coat and lightly rubbing on a second coat of a different but similar color to achieve some sort of natural weathered effect.

Anyway, I bought the paint and boldly began rolling it onto my walls. I knew immediately that something was wrong but I didn't know exactly what it was. Perhaps it would look better when it dried...wouldn't it?

No....it wouldn't

What I ended up with is an incident that I will forever remember as The Night of the Horrible Color.



Yes, I actually did that to my own wall. And yes, its looked even worse in person.

After I came to senses and realized what I had done I crawled up into the bedroom, fell down on my bed and put The Rolling Stone's 'Paint it black' on endless repeat.

Eventually I did what everyone does when they screw up, I asked my mother for help. My mother is a painter and artist and although she didn't hate the paint as much as I did she gave me a lot of good advice and helped me figure out what it was I really wanted.

Which as it turned out, was paint that didn't really look like paint. I decided that instead of going for any particular color what I wanted was something that looked like normal unpainted stucco but with a deeper, richer color. Once I figured that out I remembered a trick from my old job as a silkscreener. You see, the trick to painting a realistic looking grey is to not use grey paint but to combine other colors that have the net effect of looking grey without actually containing it. With this in mind I sent my mother to the paint store to buy paint, knowing that I cannot be trusted to pick out paint.

What I ended up with was blending three partial coats of Green, Lavender and White to create a color that looks like wet cement, a color that I rather like.




At last, I could finish the room, build interior stairs in the form commonly called ships ladders (despite how cool they look spiral staircases are very expensive and take up an enormous amount of space) I went into my second winter with all three floor livable but unfinished. It felt like I actually had a house.


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Re: The Tower

Post  Dreebus Cole on Fri Jan 25, 2013 12:33 pm

I love the tower and topic so far. I have been laying plans for my own castle of sorts for a very long time, and this may be a viable construction method. My design as it sits is slightly more extensive due to the nature of my profession requiring a bit of space (musician, teacher, composer) and that I want a set of underground food cellars attached to a kitchen.

All in all, I love the choice of location and the tower itself. POST MORE!

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Re: The Tower

Post  Mr. Tower on Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:14 pm

Thanks, expect a new post in the next day or two.

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